Posts tagged ‘painting’

Paintings by Mark Seabrook

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Power Bird, acrylic on canvas board, 18×24 inches, by anishnabe artist Mark Seabrook.  Available for purchase as of Oct. 3/019.

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Power Bird No. 5, acrylic on canvas board, 9×12 inches, by anishnabe artist Mark Seabrook.  Available.

I have to admit I’m having fun with these pieces in frames!  Normally we sell them as unframed canvas boards but I decided to switch things up last summer, and so here we are in October with a sizeable collection, getting ready for that show in November!

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Power Bird No. 6, acrylic on canvas board, 8×10 inches, by anishnabe artist Mark Seabrook.  Available.

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Tehkummah Scenes, acrylic on canvas, 8×10 inches, from the original run in 2013, artist collection.

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Twinravens, Winter Scenes, acrylic on canvas board, 5×7 inches, by anishnabe artist Mark Seabrook.IMG_8998

Tehkummah Scenes, acrylic on canvas board, 5×7 inches, by anishnabe artist Mark Seabrook.  Available.

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Big Bucks!  Acrylic on canvas board, 5×7 inches, by anishnabe artist Mark Seabrook.  Available.

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Power Bird, acrylic on canvas, 8×10 inches, by anishnabe artist Mark Seabrook.  Available.

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Visiting from Over Seas, acrylic on canvas board, 14×18 inches, by anishnabe artist Mark Seabrook.  Available.

We ship anywhere.

And so yes:  I’m having some fun here framing up these new pieces and going through the collections, framing up a few of the war horses, pieces I just couldn’t part with, playing with a new look.  And it IS fun.  We’ll be ready for that show in November!

 

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a Walk Around the Block

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Deer Clan sketch, 7×9 inches, acrylic on canvas board, February 019.  Folks we are getting close to saying good bye to Stevensons Brand acrylic paint…

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Black Cat and a Raven, sketch, 9×12 inches, acrylic on canvas board, February 019.  Based on a true story too!  Back on the range, one autumn afternoon many moons ago, good old “Whitey”, the cat with blue eyes, climbed a very tall tree out by the waterfalls and yup:  along came a few crows.  I switched out the crows for a raven.

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I thought she was holding out on me.  Turns out…  what I thought was a roll of 20 dollar bills, ready for our trip to the downtown yesterday, was nothing more than dog poop bags…

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Nice work!  At the “How to Breathe Forever” show, Onsite Gallery, 199 Richmond St. W., Toronto.  “Onsite Gallery offers powerful, thought-provoking exhibitions of art, design and new media to stimulate conversations on critical issues facing Toronto and the world.”  (Corporate pitch just inside the door)

Also just inside the door:  “OCAD University acknowledges the ancestral and traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the New Credit, the Haudensaunee, the Anishinaabe and the Huron Wendat, who are the original owners and custodians of the land on which we stand and create.”

I got to thinking: folks around here (Toronto) have better luck seeing an Indian on the skids, half snapped on Boone’s Farm, up there on University and Queen, than a live beaver, which of course is on a useless nickel.

As for the artwork, speaking of beaver, it was created by an artist from Waskaganish!  I didn’t see the details on the cards but I’m guessing they are a student at OCA.  Nice work, beadwork too.  I wonder how they’re liking the big leagues of downtown, a far stretch away from the mighty woods just east of the James Bay.

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Ink, colouring pencil on super duper high end paper, unknown North Country artist, Onsite Gallery.  The show runs to April 14th so you still have time!

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A genuine fake Norval Morrisseau, front window, unknown gallery just east of Onsite Gallery, Richmond St., Toronto.

They’ve got the scam artists front and centre in this swank place!  You can bet two Indian Head nickels that a fella like me, actual and authentic, and an active artist, couldn’t get through the front door with his work, into this joint.  You can also bet two more of those nickels that the folks in here don’t sport the same pitch as the OCA guys when it comes to the “acknowledges the ancestral and traditional territories of…” bit.  As in: if I were to walk in there and question said phoney in the picture above, how long before they’d be dialling up security to “escort this ‘gentleman’ to the door…”?

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“Indian Residential School Blues”, 36×48 inches, acrylic on canvas, by Anishnabe artist Mark Seabrook.  (alive and active, authentic too!)  Here at twinravens.com we aim to cause a fuss.

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Acrylic on Canvas board, 9×12 inches

Ah yes…  a twinravens landscape, going back to the mighty ranges just west of the town of Tehkummah, Ontario, Canada.  (We also aim to go above and beyond the woodlands!)

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Mark Seabrook, outside J.E.H. MacDonald’s house, Thornhill, Ontario, Canada, last spring, before the Scotland gig.  I knocked but Jimmy Boy wasn’t home.  (I could have passed myself off as one of the “Indian Group of Seven”, ha!)

Well this old Anishnabe boy and artist keeps rolling along, paints and brushes at the ready.  Maybe some day I’ll have my name on a window in Toronto, announcing a twinravens show, with folks waiting in line, hoping to meet the artist.

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From August 2, 2018, on Dundas St. E.  Beauty day and evening in the city.

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At his studio way back on June 20, 2017.  Did I ever tell you the story about seeing his fancy give away doctorate paper work from OCA?  It was there at his studio, in an amusing display space!

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Rubbing shoulders with the famous:  that is the mighty Jen B., lead singer of the great Anishnabe rock and roll band:  No Reservations, on July 6, 2017 (back stage, a half hour before show time!).  Not only is she a classic rock and roll vocalist and show woman, but she’s a super talented First Nations visual artist as well.  Hopefully we’ll cross paths again, sometime soon!

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Speaking of great First Nations artists: The great Jazzy Moon, on the last evening of summer holidays, Labour Day Monday, September 2, 2013  It was just me and Jazzy Moon left on the beach, Providence Bay, Manitoulin Island, the night before the start of Grade 6.  We had the beach to ourselves and the swings too, the sand, the water and the sky.

You see I’m a father who stayed pretty close to his daughter.  I was there when all those important things happened.  But here today, March 10, 2019, I am up here on the swanky 9th, Markham, Ontario, Canada, and she is in Paris, France, viewing up close and personal the likes of the Mona Lisa, the tower and the cathedral.  How I wish we could have seen it together.

(There should be some ceremonial or ritual thing for us old boys whose daughters are powering up to fly away.)(Empty nest looming like never before…  )

October sketches

to colour or not?  a mighty fine question!

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7×9 inches, acrylic on canvas board, October 2, 2018.

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7×9 inches, acrylic on canvas board, October 2, 2018.

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7×9 inches, acrylic on canvas board, October 3, 2018.

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7×9 inches, acrylic on canvas board, October 4, 2018.

hmmm.  a walk around the block might be in order.

so many paintings, so little time…

well the truth is there is a lot of time.  24 hours boys.  that’s what we have to work with.

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“water spirit”, 2018, 7×9 inches, acrylic on canvas board.  artist collection.  i’m liking that grey: made with phthalo blue, cadmium red middle, and white.  (we need that room and drying rack that was the print making room, back in art school:  a very large room with big tables, and a drying rack that looked like it would hold around 200 pieces!)

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“bear clan”, 2018, 18×24 inches, acrylic on canvas, private collection.  there is the colour scheme at work on something a bit bigger but lets imagine that colour scheme up around 36×48 inches…   hmmm.  i’m going to need to go back home for that one!

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“wolf sketch”, 2018, 7×9 inches, acrylic on canvas board, private collection.  yes and how about this idea, developing into something on a 24×36 inch canvas…   (you see this is what i’m talking about:  so many paintings…  )

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South Bay Mouth, Manitoulin Island, Ontario, Canada.  April 30th.  peaceful scenes at home:  it was just me, the great wide open, a canada goose and a dead deer…

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my birch tree, on loan from Mother Earth:  my old buddy “whitey” and i go back almost ten years now!  this one is up there on the 20th Side road, right along next to my morning walk.  May 5th.

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the entrance to the crib.  May 11th.  you see that baby grand over there:  no one is allowed to play it!  in all my days walking through the lobby i’ve never heard a single note coming from it except for the time i put my grubby paws on it and plunked out the first four bars of “October, Autumn Song”.  wasn’t long before security was there yelling “what in god’s name is going on here?!!!”

yes lads we’re in a strange land when we’re away from home…

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and so we find ourselves at times, down in the parking garage, out of sight of the many security cameras, listening to some CBC…

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“Portrait of the Artist, standing outside the MacDonald house, Thornhill, Ontario”,  J.E.H. wasn’t home…

well if my hair gets cut, it will grow back.  and these paintings don’t get made on their own!  the hands of an artist, well.  i guess you could say all of the artist is needed at the table today.  so lets have some fun with it along the way.

 

Acrylic sketches

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Acrylic on canvas board, 7×9 inches, c. 2016.  Private collection.

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Acrylic on canvas board, 7×9 inches, c. 2016.  Private collection.

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Acrylic on canvas board, 7×9 inches, 2018.  Available.

up here on the 9th, with the blue skies deluxe, you can see colours in a brand new way!

A Day at the AGO

spent a glorious morning and much of the afternoon at the Art Gallery of Ontario, November 21, 2017, going for one reason only:  to see Norval Morrisseau’s 6 panel “Man Changing Into a Thunderbird”, acrylic on canvas, 1977.  last time i saw it was at the National Gallery of Canada, 2006, and the time before that, in the book: The Art of Norval Morrisseau, 1979.  of course the book, filled with colour plates, is one thing, seeing the actual, is completely another.

so off i went on the Go Train to Union Station, subway to Yonge and Dundas, and on foot to the gallery.  without fussing with the collection i asked the lady at the front to walk me to the room where the Morrisseau paintings were hanging.

it’s an awesome thing for this Anishnabe boy to see these giant paintings:  Norval M. IS the founder of the Ojibwe Woodland School of Painting and the making of Man Changing Into a Thunderbird is a classic rock and roll story about art and art making.  my question, after viewing the work for a few hours yesterday, is:  What brand of acrylic paint did N.M. use to create this work?

pretty soon a class of high school students were brought in with the “native interpreter”, a very Indian dude about my age, sporting a long braid.  so i thought i’d stand back and listen to him make the pitch with him asking these kids, who he’d obviously lost by this point in time, why is this art work important?  boy oh boy he was plum off the map!  he wasn’t even in the ball park!  it’s pretty clear he hadn’t done his homework on this one.

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here is a photo with some kids in the shot, to give you some idea how big these paintings are.

after a few hours with the pieces i decided to boo through the rest of the gallery and see what they had.  it wasn’t long before i heard Erik Satie’s Gymnopedies:

(i’ve never been to Paris so this is pretty much “Once Upon A Time in Tehkummah” for me, switch out the beautiful Edouard Cortes paintings for some “range scenes”)

i thought i was hearing a soundtrack for an installation so i followed the sounds and found myself at the entrance to Guillermo, “Del Toro: At Home With Monsters”, an exhibition of his collections, films and notebooks.

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“Del Toro: At Home With Monsters”

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“At Home With Monsters”

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“At Home With Monsters”  (how would you like to have that thing sitting in the living room, over the fireplace, when the power goes out…  )

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“At Home With Monsters”  (is that Edgar Allan, giving you know who, a reading?)(those windows were live:  they had the thunder going, the rain on the glass, the trees moving with the breeze:  ultra spooky!)

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“At Home With Monsters”  (hmmm…  )

so anyway:  i’m walking around in there, eyes wide open, ears too because i’m hearing some of my favourite solo piano music and check this out:

WOW!  there is the source of the music:  a young and spooky looking whippersnapper on a black baby grand!  mega WOW!  i LOVE the music but i love it even more when i see it happening right there in front of me!  now hey, that really made my day, right there.  and so i stayed on, enjoyed the beautiful sounds coming up and out of that baby grand.  nice work!  and i said so, to the kid.

well you can’t have too much art in one day.  so i’ll come back tomorrow with Chapter 2:  Mark’s Day at the AGO.

paintings by Mark Seabrook

we’re going down memory lane this morning in the art department, looking at some of my work with the question in mind:  What makes art Canadian?  we’re asking after attending last night’s sleepy little outing to the Isabel Bader Theatre, Charles St. West, Toronto, where the Art Canada Institute gave their mission statement a stretch!  the ACI is dedicated to making Canadian art history a contemporary conversation.  in with last night’s conversation, a gal made her presentation on Norval Morrisseau, creator of the Woodland School, and his place in all of this.  of course what caught my eye in the promo was a detail of Morrisseau’s Man Changing Into a Thunderbird, panel 1 of 6.  (that’s the work that sparked my imagination way back in art school!  (even though i came up on Manitoulin Island and the second generations of woodland school painters were everywhere and you couldn’t drive 10 miles without seeing their stuff, courtesy of the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation))

A Self Portrait on November 30th by Mark Seabrook

“November 30th”, 2008, 30×40 inches, acrylic on canvas, Private Collection.

Bear Clan with White Raven

“Bear Clan”, 2011, acrylic on canvas board, 18×24 inches, Artist Collection.

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“Water Spirit”, 2014, acrylic on canvas, 24×36 inches, Private Collection.

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“2 Wolves, Feeding”, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 36×48 inches, Private Collection.

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30×30 inches

“Missing and Murdered Indian Women, No. 1”, 2015, acrylic on canvas, 30×30 inches, Private Collection.

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For Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women, Acrylic on canvas, 36×58 inches

“For Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women”, 2015, acrylic on canvas, 36×58 inches.  Sale price:  $4 000.

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Acrylic on canvas, 30×40 inches

“For Missing and Murdered Women”, 2015, acrylic on canvas, 30×40 inches.  Sale price:  $3 800.

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“Indian Residential School Survivor, No. 1”, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 30×40 inches.  Sale price:  $3 800.

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“60’s Scoop Survivors: Lost child, lost parent”, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 20×40 inches.  Sale price:  $2 800.

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“I.R.S. No. 1”, November 2017, acrylic on canvas board, 7×9 inches.  Sale price:  $200.

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“I.R.S. No. 2”, November 2017, acrylic on canvas board, 7×9 inches.  Sale price:  $200.

Original artwork by First Nations and Anishnabe painter:  Mark Seabrook, Manitoulin Island (which is right here in Canada!).